A World War II vet returning home from Europe was asked the difference between Americans and the French. "Well, he said, an American sees a fellow drive by in a luxury car and dreams of the day when he can have one. The Frenchman sees a fellow drive by in a luxury car and dreams of the day when he can make him get out and walk like everyone else."

I fear a large number of U.S. citizens are acquiring the French attitude and deserting the model which unquestionably provided the greatest wealth and improved lifestyle for the most people in history. Furthermore, a gaggle of nations, rather than emulate this wildly successful model, are doing their best to make America "get out and walk like every other nation" (in comparison).

Your half-page Sunday review of British author Elizabeth D. Samet's book, "Looking for the Good War," reveals yet another effort to denigrate the magnificent achievement of the USA and its "greatest generation." Ironically, were it not for the USA, Ms. Samet would likely be speaking German now.

A far, far better book for insight into what the "greatest generation" was able to do is contained in Daniel James Brown's book, "The Boys in the Boat." These are the kind of people that left the farms and factories and became citizen soldiers of the first order and led to victory.

— Lynn Blystone, Bakersfield