Nearly two dozen Cal State Bakersfield geology students, faculty, alumni and dual-credit high school teachers presented research at two separate national conferences last month.

In Houston, Texas, an undergraduate and alumnus presented at the AfricaArray Diversity Forum, which sets out to improve the seismic network in Africa to help mitigate earthquake disasters from mining, which claims scores of lives every year in South Africa.

At the national Geological Society of America conference in Seattle, 19 presented their research findings. Some presentations included evidence of large ancient river systems and shifting drainage patterns in the San Joaquin Valley that could help inform future water management; research on tectonic uplift of the Santa Rosalia Basin in Mexico; and the impact of the 2016 Erskine Fire on soil properties and landslide risk.

Season of Light shows Thursday

Bakersfield College’s William M. Thomas Planetarium will be showing the holiday show “Season of Light” twice this season, starting Thursday.

The shows begin with a short tour of the evening sky using the planetarium’s Goto Chronos star projector, followed by the 37-minute all-dome presentation, which traces the history and development of many of the world’s holiday customs, all of which involve lighting up the winter season – from burning the Yule log and sparkling Christmas tree lights to lighting of luminarias and the Chanukah Menorah.

The production recounts the historical religious and cultural practices practice during the time of winter solstice and looks at more light-hearted seasonal traditions, including gift giving and kissing under the mistletoe and songs about lords-a-leaping and ladies dancing.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and children ages 5 to 12. The show runs from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m. Nov. 30 and Dec. 7. Doors open at 7 p.m. and will be closed during the program with no late admittances allowed. Tickets can be purchased at the Bakersfield College ticket office.

BC enrollment begins Wednesday

Bakersfield College will begin enrolling students for the spring semester Wednesday.

Students can start the application and admissions process at www.Bakersfieldcollege.edu/steps. Those steps include completing an application, attending an in-person or online orientation, completing assessment tests for core classes, developing an education plan and registering and paying enrollment fees.

Kern Leaders Academy graduates 8

The Kern Leaders Academy graduated eight community members this month.

The academy, which is run through the Kern Taxpayers Association, assists in the development of visionary community leaders through a nine-week course that includes talks from business and industry leaders studying topics in ethics, critical thinking, the economy, education, health and more.

The graduates are Doug McIsaac, a retired community development director for the City of Bakersfield; Nicole Benenati, a Kern River Valley community advocate; Dixie Walters, a Kern County Sheriff’s Office detention sergeant; Jonathan Harshman, the issues and reputation advisor for Chevron North America Exploration and Production Company in Bakersfield; May Abdalla, the administrative director of organizational performance at Adventist Health-Bakersfield; Tiara King, program manager for The Counseling and Psychotherapy Center; Tanner Dyrness, a field representative for Assemblyman Vince Fong, R-Bakersfield; and Arleana Waller, the CEO and founder of ShePOWER Global.

Foothill High students return to class today

Foothill High School students return to class Tuesday after received an extra day of vacation after a water outage forced the cancellation of classes Monday. 

The campus student body of about 2,000 students may not have to make up that school day, either, said Kern High School District spokeswoman Lisa Krch. 

District officials plan to file a waiver with the California Department of Education that would make up for the loss of average daily attendance dollars and the legally required instructional time by citing the water outage as an extraordinary circumstance, Krch said. That waiver process could take as long as three months. 

If the waiver is denied, Krch said, the district has set aside an extra day at the end of the school year to make up for the lost day.