Steven Spielberg’s 1998 film “Saving Private Ryan” was a watershed moment in cinema. The intense opening sequence depicting American forces landing at Normandy Beach and the overwhelming strike that followed didn’t just raise the bar of combat realism in film, it vaporized it. The surround-sound bullets whizzing, the carnage, the terror, the suffocation, the frightening unpredictability of war was so expertly rendered that the only cinematic moment that rivaled the film’s first 25 minutes was the film’s last 25 minutes.

This summer marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day and the film’s 21st. On Monday, the Fox Theater will host a showing of “Saving Private Ryan." Military vehicles, like jeeps and a personnel carrier of various vintages (don’t count on a tank), will be displayed outside the Fox Theater and WWII-era re-enactors will be available for photos. The ladies from California Pinups & Patriots will usher, taking tickets and working the concession stands.

Proceeds from ticket sales go to the Armed Forces Support Foundation. Established by Ben and Jenny Patten, the upstart group, according to its website, is dedicated to providing financial and non-financial assistance to veterans of all eras "in appreciation and recognition of their sacrifices." Efforts have included home repairs and modifications such as wheelchair ramps; providing work boots, and clothes or suits for job interviews; and obtaining grants to veterans of all eras.

For more information on the group, visit armedforcessupportfoundation.org.

Event coordinator Marc Sandall, 62, hopes that the event will be a success to help local veterans.

“It’s cool to be part of a community that supports this. The police department supporting closing the street off (for the displayed military vehicles on 20th Street). We have people really supporting this to help sponsor to offset the costs of the movie and people are stepping up. We’re in a great country to the point that we can do this kind of thing to help the people that support and defend our nation.”

“We’re gonna step up for them because they stepped up and were there for us.”

A word of caution: Two decades have not diminished the power of this movie one iota and the combat horror on screen is definitely not for children. It’s rated a heavy R for good reason. But for youth with the right maturity, this is about as brutal a primer for war as it gets and a small insight, that in real life, the good guys don’t always get back up.

“Saving Private Ryan,” 6-9 p.m. Monday, Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $5; proceeds go to the Armed Forces Support Foundation. ticketfly.com; 324-1369.

No trophy Wives at this show

Modern Wives album release, 9 p.m. Friday, Sandrini’s Public House, 1918 Eye St.. $5.

No Name Tour, 4:30-10 p.m. at Bruised Reeds, 1660 S St. $5.

Local rock quartet Modern Wives has discovered a fountain of youth of sorts. With most of its members — guitarist Raul Gallardo, bass player Gary Rink and drummer Tyler Patterson — safely entrenched in their 30s (outlier singer/guitarist Dan Thompson is 40), it’s not what you play, or even who you were, it’s in what you keep with you. Also, it’s in what keeps driving you.

Patterson credits fatherhood — Rink is the only member sans children — with helping the band stay focused.

" ... It shows us that we can still be young and we still know how to write a good tune and have it be for an audience that is really looking for the next best rock influence in their life. If it’s a local one? So be it. We’re not trying to be that way, it just kinda ended up that way.”

The band’s upcoming gig at Sandrini’s Public House this Friday will be a release party for its second album, “Lust is a Monster.” The CD, expertly designed in a hazy, dot art yellow-and-purple scheme by Gallardo, is a particular epiphany. Tracks like “You Should Know” aren’t just unabashedly poppy but bask in the kind of bouncy sing-alongs that audiences used to revel in.

The band’s influences aren't as obvious or as reverent as they were on their previous release, 2017s “City Sleeps,” but the sound leans toward a darker emo power-pop that brings out the exuberance of the band and its members. Especially singer Thompson, who finds light thematically on the other side of the void.

Other songs, like “Gare Bare” and “Chaos is Design Theory,” echo the early aughts with the former song packing some breathy Deftones-influenced “ahhh”s for good measure.

There’s a lot of space on the record for each member to pass the lead and serve as a part of the distillation process. They’ve filtered a generation’s worth of rock, pop, emo and even prog-rock from their collective experiences as musicians and refined it into a neat tonic. In doing so, they’ve mined another key to staying relevant: When it comes to getting older, be true to yourselves and don’t be afraid to celebrate the old good stuff. With the right approach, it’s alchemy.

“There’s more musicality in this one,” Patterson, 34, said. “It’s all of our favorite music tied into one product.”

(The album is also available on Apple Music.)

Also performing will be fellow over-30 local indie rock mainstay Niner Niner who has found its own brand of mojo: expertly played rock tempered with the right amount of grit played with expert conviction and youthful abandon. Impressive local rock trio Magic Mammoth and the San Diego-based “Heavy Punk Funk Rhythm Section” duo (per their Facebook page) Parade of Horribles fill out the bill.

Magic Mammoth will also play an all-ages show at Bruised Reeds on Saturday with a packed lineup stacked with out-of-town talent. The main event is As We Are, out of Illinois on their "As We Are" tour. Settle Your Score from Ohio, Calling All Captains from Canada and Texas' Gold Steps will also perform, turning Bakersfield into a temporary international touring hub.

Local support will be provided by the ever-busy Ryan Barge and Me 2nd!, a tribute to Me First (aka Me First and the Gimme Gimmes), a punk supergroup that performs punk rock versions of non-punk songs from various genres. In essence, making Me 2nd! a defacto cover band of a cover band. Brilliant.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.