Reader: First, I love The Bakersfield Californian — the comics, puzzles, many great columnists, and of course, news. My father was a newspaperman also. He owned his own paper, lost it in the Depression and then worked for several other papers, including lastly, the N.Y. Daily News.

It is an exhausting time to be alive. There’s a pandemic, sure, but also civil unrest and so much political turmoil. Passionate disagreements fill our social media feeds and spill over into every crevice of our conscience, not to mention that many Americans’ livelihoods are on hold with the …

In last Sunday's newspaper, reporter Stacey Shepard and photographer Alex Horvath presented to readers a special report on coronavirus from inside Bakersfield Memorial Hospital. The headline summed up what readers could expect to read: "More anxiety, more sickness, more stress: Inside Bakers…

“You really ought to do something about your feet,” Sue said, looking at them, as if they were not feet but sea creatures that are normally found in the cold, dark muck at the bottom of the ocean and have no business floating to the surface.

Cop Tales are true stories as told by law enforcement officers from all over the country. The stories are told in the first person. The actual officer’s initials follow each story.

To be Catholic is to be comfortable with mystery. It is a matter of faith that some of the things Catholics believe in, like the Trinity or the virgin birth or the transubstantiation of bread and wine into Jesus’ body and blood, cannot be explained. The human rational mind cannot fathom the …

Reader: Thank you, Steven Mayer, for uplifting me with a hopeful and beautiful message of love and kindness that is the mural outside the homeless center in Bakersfield ("Artists painting mural at navigation center for homeless were once homeless themselves," July 24).

Cop Tales are true stories as told by law enforcement officers from all over the country. The stories are told in the first person. The actual officer’s initials follow each story.

My wife, Susie, and I returned home from a not too common mom-and-dad-only date night. When we arrived home our young children, Nikki, Brenna, Sean and Aaron, were sound asleep cuddled up in their favorite cozy spots in our living room. Twins Sean and Aaron were barely visible stretched out …

I still haven’t killed my first mosquito. I’ve had lots of opportunities but these little ___ (fill in your favorite colorful word) are turbo-charged and smart. It’s as if this species, Aedes aegypti, "an aggressive, day-biting mosquito, which has the potential to spread viruses such as deng…

Cop Tales are true stories as told by law enforcement officers from all over the country. The stories are told in the first person. The actual officer’s initials follow each story.

How to start this column? Maybe with a proposal: If you are a white person who doesn’t believe white privilege is a thing, stay with me. Just for 900 words. I know that you have possibly sworn never to read another word of mine, but humor me. I can explain white privilege to you, because I h…

On my desk is a quart-sized Mason jar filled to the brim with coins. The jar, as the label indicates, previously held Luigi’s Italian beans, which if you have not had them, are like money, better than money and whose flavor is more long-lasting than anything money can buy.

A couple of weeks ago in my last “A Modest Proposal” article, I wrote about the idea of taking out the seating at the stage in Beale Park to allow for more people to participate in events and to increase safety in the park after hours. Today I wish to continue in a similar vein with another …

Cop Tales are true stories as told by law enforcement officers from all over the country. The stories are told in the first person. The actual officer’s initials follow each story.

Many years ago when I was a student at North High School, I would spend weekends during pheasant season hunting with two of my teachers, Bob Newbrough and coach Jordan "Turk" Eliades.

Is it me or are the mosquitoes worse this year? If there was a year where mosquitoes would swarm like bad news, this is the one. Mosquitoes and pandemic go together like biscuits and honey or the opposite, because they are neither pleasing nor sweet.

It is refreshing and good to see young people once again getting actively involved in the ongoing struggle for social justice. There was a good turnout at this year's Juneteenth celebration at Yokuts Park marking the end of slavery in the United States.

editor's pick

It had a special symmetry. 2020. The configuration conveyed order and balance, almost a harmony of sorts. Twenty on your side of the ledger, twenty on mine. In a society that bats around phrases like equal justice — never mind what the reality might always have been — its rhythm felt like a …