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1 For the first time, The Californian has published online "The story of us," a collection of history pieces, old photos, columns and an exhaustive timeline chronicling 150 years of Kern County history. It had been included with the printed paper on Aug. 6, 2016, but not made available to on…

They include a longtime local political aide who decided to step out from behind the scenes. A new city school district superintendent who has begun to make his mark — and make some waves. And a young runner who may be the next big standout at storied McFarland High School.

If the scenario sounds like a country song, maybe it's because it actually became one: Singer returns to the hometown he loved/loathed/ultimately escaped to make peace, relive his earliest memories of home and family, and say goodbye.

The Californian remembers the people we lost this year who helped shape the city’s identity and inspire us. Reflections on country music great Merle Haggard and activist Helen Chavez begin our special commemoration

Robert Price, Senior Editor for The Bakersfield Californian and author of "The Bakersfield Sound: How a Generation of Displaced Okies Revolutionized American Music," sits down alongside Eye Street Editor Jennifer Self to remember the great musician Merle Haggard after his death in 2016. 

As Kern County celebrates its 150th anniversary, we honor a colorful past full of dreamers, doers, movers and shakers. I'd like to tell you about a few of the people who helped make Kern County what it is today.

In 1931, here in the San Joaquin Valley, the term "agribusiness" first appeared in the American lexicon. Farming in Kern County has usually been a family affair, but these families (often Eastern and Southern European immigrants), frequently created highly successful farming operations that …

The Kern River once tumbled out of its canyon, all the way to the valley floor, feeding a network of river channels, sloughs and lakes fringed by thick tule reeds and riparian woodlands. It made "much noise," Father Garces wrote in 1776, and flowed with "crystalline, bountiful and palatable"…

One of the signature books (and films) of the 1980s was "The Right Stuff," Tom Wolfe's outstanding look at the early years of Edwards Air Force Base and the fabled test pilot program. In the years before and after World War II, Muroc Army Air Field (later Edwards) would be home to most of th…

When the United States entered World War I, Kern County's 50,000 residents were in a unique position to contribute with their gold and silver mines, oil fields and a growing agriculture industry.

Kern County's first sheriff's deputies didn't have it easy. Back then, the Winchester lever-action rifle was advanced weaponry, understanding of DNA was generations in the future and horsepower didn't go beyond one. Outlaw gangs, Indians and the elements (the invention of the first modern ai…

Kern County boasts nearly 40 high schools, one university, three community colleges — almost all with full sports programs — plus two minor league teams, a handful of race tracks, numerous golf courses and bowling centers and various other sports facilities.

It's a sure bet that the 36,000 residents of Bakersfield, the 9,000 in Arvin/ Lamont, and the 2,000 in Tehachapi never heard of the White Wolf Fault. But at 4:52 a.m. on July 21, it introduced itself by moving the earth for a near-minute.

Estimates of the number of valley fever cases recorded by local, state and federal agencies vary so widely that they call into question the accuracy of the figures released to the public, a Center for Health Journalism Collaborative investigation has found.

The peak season for valley fever has always been the fall months before a significant rain fall. As a retired microbiologist from the Kern County Health Department, and having done significant testing for valley fever, I can tell you September and October can see 200 to 400 cases a week.

Against the backdrop of an epidemic in Kern County, The Valley Fever for Americas Foundation is hosting a fundraiser Wednesday to drum up funding for a cure to the debilitating respiratory disease endemic to the region.

When a punishing drought besieged California in the late 1980s, relief came with 30 days of rain in 1991 — dubbed the March Miracle because of how it revived the state’s agricultural economy.

We at TBC Media had an idea for a Halloween serial written by staffers one chapter at a time, each writer taking up the story where it left off, pushing the plot forward, with no one knowing exactly how it would end. A new chapter will appear every day on bakersfield.com and in The Californi…