Notorious mass murderer Charles Manson remained hospitalized in Bakersfield Tuesday for treatment of an undisclosed ailment, according to numerous media reports that were confirmed to The Californian by a local source.

Manson's hospitalization was first reported by TMZ, which said the 1960s cult leader was suffering from gastrointestinal issues. An unnamed source told the Los Angeles Times that Manson, who has also previously suffered from heart problems, was seriously ill.

Manson, 82 and imprisoned 65 miles north of Bakersfield at Corcoran State Prison, arrived at Mercy Hospital's downtown location Sunday night via the ER and was signed in as "Joe Doe," according to The Californian's source, who requested anonymity.

It was unclear if Manson was still being treated there or had been transferred to another hospital. However, several media organizations had Mercy's Truxtun Avenue hospital staked out Tuesday evening.

Manson had not been admitted to the hospital's intensive care unit, The Californian's source said.

When asked if Manson was at Mercy, Michelle Willow, spokesman for Dignity Health Mercy and Memorial Hospitals, said, "We have no information on a person by that name."

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation spokeswoman Terry Thornton said she could not comment on medical issues regarding Manson or any other inmate. She did, however, confirm Manson was alive.

Manson is serving life without parole at Corcoran for leading his followers in a killing spree over two nights in 1969. 

They killed actress Sharon Tate and four others at Tate's home on Aug. 9, 1969. Tate was 8 1/2-months pregnant at the time. Grocers Leno and Rosemary LaBianca were killed the following evening. 

Manson, Leslie Van Houten, Patricia Krenwinkle, Susan Atkins and Charles Tex Watkins were each convicted of multiple counts of murder. 

Manson has repeatedly been denied parole, and his next hearing is scheduled for 2027. 

The story of how Manson lured young people into following him — and ordered them to carry out the gruesome killings he claimed were intended to start a race war — has infiltrated popular culture and been featured in books, movies, TV shows and music.

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