DENVER (AP) — In some versions of a story Jan. 2 about the slaying of a Colorado sheriff's deputy, The Associated Press reported erroneously that more than 580,000 people have taken advantage of mental health services in the state since they were expanded after a 2012 mass shooting. The department said Wednesday that agencies have provided mental health services more than 580,000 times, but some of those instances might have been one individual getting help multiple times.

A corrected version of the story is below:

The Latest: VA document says gunman had fled mental ward

A Veterans Affairs document obtained by The Associated Press says the gunman who killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy escaped from the mental health ward of a VA hospital in Wyoming in 2014 but was located and returned

DENVER (AP) — The Latest on the fatal shooting of a sheriff's deputy in Colorado (all times local):

7:30 p.m.

A Veterans Affairs document obtained by The Associated Press says the gunman who killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy escaped from the mental health ward of a VA hospital in Wyoming in 2014 but was located and returned.

The document was provided to the AP by a congressional aide on condition of anonymity because the aide was not authorized to release it.

The document was first reported by The Denver Post.

Colorado authorities say Matthew Riehl fatally shot Douglas County Deputy Zackari Parrish and wounded four other officers on Sunday. Riehl was killed by a SWAT team.

The VA document says Riehl was hospitalized at the veterans medical center in Sheridan, Wyoming, in April 2014 after a psychotic episode. It says he escaped but was found and brought back.

The document identifies Riehl as an Army veteran who was honorably discharged.

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6:45 p.m.

A Veterans Affairs document obtained by The Associated Press says the gunman who killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy escaped from the mental health ward of a VA hospital in Wyoming in 2014 but was located and returned.

The document was provided to the AP by a congressional aide on condition of anonymity because the aide was not authorized to release it.

The document was first reported by The Denver Post.

Colorado authorities say Matthew Riehl fatally shot Douglas County Deputy Zackari Parrish and wounded four other deputies on Sunday. Riehl was killed by a SWAT team.

The VA document says Riehl was hospitalized at the veterans medical center in Sheridan, Wyoming, in April 2014 after a psychotic episode. It says he escaped but was found and brought back.

The document identifies Riehl as an Army veteran who was honorably discharged.

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4:45 p.m.

The slaying of a Colorado sheriff's deputy is the most recent in a string of fatal shootings involving suspects who may have had mental health problems, and the state has expanded services in hopes of finding a solution.

Colorado opened 12 walk-in mental health crisis centers across the state and set up a 24-hour hotline after a gunman killed 12 people in a suburban Denver movie theater in 2012. Doctors testified the gunman, James Holmes, was mentally ill.

Holmes pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. But the jury rejected his plea and convicted him of murder.

The Colorado Department of Human Services said the state has provided help more than 580,000 times under the expanded services, but some of those instances might have been one individual getting help multiple times.

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3:55 p.m.

A man who shot and killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy was licensed as a lawyer for five years in Wyoming before voluntarily giving up his license in 2016.

Wyoming Bar Association executive director Sharon Wilkinson says Matthew Riehl practiced at a law firm in the small city of Rawlins and later opened his own practice.

She says he was admitted to the bar in May 2011 and voluntarily withdrew in October 2016, making him ineligible to practice law in the state. That's the same year records indicate he moved back to Colorado.

Wilkinson says the bar received no complaints about Riehl.

She says Riehl did not disclose say why he withdrew.

However, she noted that October is when the bar's annual dues are due and it's common for lawyers who no longer want to practice in the state to withdraw at that time.

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3:35 p.m.

A man who shot and killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy says he was drinking in a video streamed online before the shooting.

Denver's KUSA-TV obtained the footage, one of several videos that Matthew Riehl broadcast on Periscope on Sunday.

He is seen holding a glass in his hand and says he's had two scotches. He is heard saying that drinking would help him defend himself if someone bothers him.

The station says the videos include footage of him firing on deputies who came to his suburban Denver apartment after he called 911.

It did not broadcast that portion but a clip purporting to show it has been posted elsewhere online.

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1:30 p.m.

The man who shot and killed a Colorado sheriff's deputy made videos of himself calling 911 and then opening the door and talking to officers before the shooting.

Denver's KUSA-TV obtained the footage live-streamed on Periscope. The station aired clips from two videos in which Matthew Riehl says he wouldn't hurt anyone except to defend himself before making the call.

He talks to at least two officers, telling them he wants to file an emergency restraining order against his domestic partner. He is upset when one offers to give him a phone number to call and goes back into a room.

The station said Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock verified the videos. They include footage of the shooting Sunday that also wounded four other deputies, but the station didn't air it.

Officers killed Riehl.

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12:35 a.m.

Authorities had been contacted with concerns about the mental health of Matthew Riehl over a month before he shot and killed a Colorado deputy and wounded four others. But Riehl was never held for mental evaluation.

After Riehl published several social media posts critical of University of Wyoming professors, the campus police chief says officers called police in Lone Tree, Colorado, in November to warn them about Riehl, suggesting his rants were indicative of mental illness.

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office says authorities received a call Sunday from someone who said Riehl might be having a mental breakdown, but deputies found no evidence of a crime and left.

Later, deputies responded to another call about Riehl. Authorities say Riehl fired more than 100 rounds before he was killed.

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This story has been corrected to reflect the wounded included three deputies and one police officer, not four deputies.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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