1 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Skyler Stewart, 23, flies from one ramp to another at the new Planz Road skatepark in south Bakersfield. Stewart says he has been skating "his whole life." About 200 skaters showed up for the Thursday grand opening.

2 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Fifteen-year-old BHS student Orion Blackburn flips his board as he goes off a riser at the new Planz Road skatepark.

3 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Henry Walker, 15, tries his luck sliding down a rail at the new Planz Road skatepark.

4 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Tanner Kitchen, 20, left, and Todd Parker, 21, fist bump their approval of the new skatepark on Planz Road.

5 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Mayor Harvey Hall, lower right, made quick work of cutting the ribbon at the new Planz Road skatepark and then got out of the way as skateboarders took over the new facility.

6 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Skaters with their boards stand at the ready for the new park to open on Planz Road.

7 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Skateboarders wait for the formalities and speeches to end so they can get to the business of skating at the new skatepark on Planz Road. About 200 skaters showed up to ride the new park.

8 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Two of the rules read before the opening of the new skatepark on Planz Road were "wear helmets and no bikes," but 19-year-old Tyler Walters rode the park anyway, saying, "It's so cool I can't resist!" Though police were on site, no citations were given.

9 of 9

Buy Photo

Felix Adamo/ The Californian

Planz skatepark

Conveniently timed to open around the time area schools got out Thursday, the new Planz Park skatepark became an instant southeast success when around 300 skaters showed up ready to shred.

The skatepark replaced a pool -- which technically could have been skated once drained -- with a bowl that was about 100 percent more zen, and probably more skateable, too.

What's the difference?

Shallower transitions, and survivability.

Skaters call the rectangular pool filter opening the "deathbox" for its unique ability to send one hurtling, sans board, into the deep end.

This new skatepark -- designed by skaters for skaters -- doesn't have a deathbox, or a pool light or steps, making it all ride all the time.