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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Randi Zuckerburg, CEO of Zuckerberg Media, and editor-in-chief of Dot Complicated is the keynote speaker at the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Randi Zuckerburg, CEO of Zuckerberg Media, and editor-in-chief of Dot Complicated speaks at the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday. She was also an early executive at Facebook.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Randi Zuckerburg, CEO of Zuckerberg Media, and editor-in-chief of Dot Complicated, speaks at the annual Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday at the Rabobank Convention Center in Bakersfield.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

People attending the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference seem to enjoy Randi Zuckerberg's keynote address Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Attendees of the Bakersfield Women's Business Conference fill the Rabobank Convention Center Thursday to hear speakers including keynote speaker Randi Zuckerberg.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Technology was in use during the Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday where many speakers addressed social media and technology used in business and the new business environment it creates.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

United Farmworkers Union co-founder Dolores Huerta was honored during the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Financial expert Denise Winston speaks at the Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday in a talk titled "Get what you want."

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

"To Blog or Not to Blog" was the title of Janelle Capra's talk during the Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Shatierra Smith, right, chats with Christine Almengor from Sam's Club during a short break at the Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

The 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference was a good time for businesses and organizations to speak to women about what they have to offer.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Kern Medical Center pharmacist Ryan J. Gates speaks to Bakersfield Women's Business Conference attendees about diabetes at the KMC booth Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Women attending the annual Bakersfield Women's Business Conference seem to enjoy keynote speaker Randi Zuckerburg Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Women attending the annual Bakersfield Women's Business Conference listen to one of the speakers Thursday.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Ann Patel, Marine Lopez, and Elsa Pinoliar attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Sara Moore and Jennifer Howard attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Kathy Carder and Judy Kahler attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Sophia Hackler and Paola Becerra attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Jamielynn Cota and Cat Bernard attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Melissa Sherman and Kensley Daniels attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Lisa Srip and Diana Raines attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Laura Rodriguez and Jessica Carrillo attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Cristina Blackmon and Cathy Badgley attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

Genetra Richardson and Rose Jones attend the 2014 Bakersfield Women's Business Conference.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Lisvett Garcia and Kaitlin Skeels.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Chad Mundy, Patty Keefer, and Kim Jenkins.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Lori Tolleson and Aniece Amos.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Angela Chavez and Leah Chavez.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Maria Gonzalez and Elva Hernandez.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Paris Strongin and Jared Gianquinto.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Katie Allen, Robin Mangarin Scott and Janelle Capra.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

MIchelle Willow and Roya Armon.

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Casey Christie / The Californian

Pauline Matundan and Tami Stickley.

Randi Zuckerberg, founder of media production company Zuckerberg Mediaand sister of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, stood center stage at the 25th Bakersfield Women's Business Conference Thursday.

A panel of women sat both to the left and right of the CEO, and flat screens hung above the heads of her audience — a mix of female educators, and technology and business leaders.

Her message to the sold-out audience in her keynote address was to take risks and use technology’s possibilities to shape their futures.

She said her introduction to the digital arena came after her 2003 graduation from Harvard University: the New York offices of worldwide advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather. Her peers joined what she described as “glamorous” television ad campaigns.

“I got staffed on a new team called interactive and digital marketing, and I was pissed off,” she said.

The audience of about 1,400 at Rabobank Arena Theater & Convention Center chuckled.

“I called my mom,” Zuckerberg said. “I cried. I thought I was in a dead-end career. I wanted to be on television sets with celebrities.”

There was a silver lining.

Two years later everyone was still pouring coffee on television sets, and interactive was the fastest growing part of Ogilvy & Mather,” Zuckerberg said.

With much persuasion from her younger brother, Mark, and a JetBlue plane ticket, in 2005 she visited a fledgling operation of his in Silicon Valley then called The Facebook.

“I was blown away by what I saw,” she said.

Zuckerberg described around-the-clock coding, a seemingly endless stream of Twinkies and Red Bull, and unforgettable passion.

“I never ever could have imagined in my life how exciting it was to be surrounded by people with such intense dreams of entrepreneurship,” she said.

The then-24-year-old would help turn Facebook into a multi-billion dollar social media giant.

Thursday, she wove examples of the risks taken and innovation pursued into a narrative of her career and family life that the audience accented with laughter.

She listed top 10 social media trends — using social media connections as a currency to access special offers, for example, and “lifelogging,” or using social media to document daily life — promoted her two books “Dot” and “Dot Complicated,” and sprinkled references to her dedication to supporting women in entrepreneurial and technological roles.

In an earlier press conference, she pointed to an increase in female business leaders in Silicon Valley since she first joined her brother at the technological hub in 2005 to create Facebook’s social media marketing programs.

“When I first arrived in Silicon Valley, you could virtually count the number of women executives, founders of companies, on your hands,” Zuckerberg said. “Now there’s an entire investment firm dedicated to funding women startups.”

“There are incubator programs that require women on founding teams of startups,” she added. “It’s really an exciting new world out there.”

Her aim at the women’s conference was to encourage women to overcome the crippling fear of failure.

“All of us are going to fall on our face at some point,” she said. “And failure is not fatal. It’s not permanent.”